New Interdisciplinary Project: Agroecology, Sustainable Food Production and Landscape Conservation: International Collaborations between Japan and the Americas (2019-2023)

We have just published a new webpage of our Agroecology Project, “Agroecology, Sustainable Food Production, and Landscape Conservation,” which is funded by the Environmental Research Grant of the Sumitomo Foundation through the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN) . The project is a logical extension of the 2016 Kyoto Agroecology Declaration, a statement issued after a transdisciplinary workshop on agroecology of May 21-22, 2016, hosted by the Small-Scale Economies Project at RIHN. Check out our project page! Click HERE.

Impressions from New Discoveries in East and Southeast Asia (April 29, 2019)

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On April 29, 2019, Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Center for Southeast Asia StudiesCenter for Japanese Studies (CJS)Center for Korean Studies (CKS)Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Dept. of Anthropologyand Archaeological Research Facility, UC Berkeley celebrated the publication of the Handbook of East and Southeast Asian Archaeology with the three editors of this volume: Junko Habu, Anthropology, UC Berkeley, and two prominent scholars in the field of Asian Archaeology. Prof. John W. Olsen (University of Arizona) and Peter V. Lape (University of Washington).

Habu spoke about how different theoretical perspectives coming out of Asian archaeology can enrich the globsl study of Archaeology. Olsen spoke about his recent archaeological expeditions in Mongolia and Tibet with a focus on Paleolithic archaeology in these regions. Lape discussed his recent survey of small islands in eastern Indonesia and new information about the Island Southeast Asian Neolithic period. Gyoung-Ah Lee (University of Oregon), a specialist of Chulmun Archaeology in Korea, joined the event as a discussant.

Of special note, Olsen revealed exciting new discoveries on the Tibetan Plateau, including a Denisovan mandible dated to 160,000 years ago, 100,000 years before the first signs of human activity in the area. Clearly, asian archaeology has much to reveal about human origins!

New Discoveries in East and Southeast Asian Archaeology (3-5 PM, April 29, 180 Doe, UC Berkeley)

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Place: Room 180, Doe Library, UC Berkeley (See map)

Co-sponsored by:  Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Dept. of Anthropology, and Archaeological Research Facility, UC Berkeley

Overview: This event celebrates the publication of the Handbook of East and Southeast Asian Archaeology with the three editors of this volume: Junko Habu, Anthropology, UC Berkeley, and two prominent scholars in the field of Asian Archaeology. Prof. John W. Olsen (University of Arizona) and Peter V. Lape (University of Washington). Olsen will talk about his recent archaeological expeditions in Mongolia and Tibet with a focus on Paleolithic archaeology in these regions. Lape will discuss his recent survey of small islands in eastern Indonesia and new information about the Island Southeast Asian Neolithic period. Gyoung-Ah Lee (University of Oregon), a specialist of Chulmun Archaeology in Korea, will also join the event as a discussant.

Presentations:

3:00-3:15: Junko Habu (UC Berkeley): Introduction

3:15-3:45: John W. Olsen (University of Arizona): The Initial Peopling of the Tibetan Plateau: An Archaeological Perspective

3:45-4:15 Peter V. Lape (University of Washington): Neolithic networks and the origins of the spice trade in Island Southeast Asia

4:15-5:00 Discussion (Discussant: Gyoung-Ah Lee, University of Oregon)

Abstract Page

Event Contact:  ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809

AGROECOLOGY IN JAPAN AND THE AMERICAS: HISTORY, PRACTICE AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS (1-5PM, April 26, 2019)

Time: 1-5PM, April 26, 2019 (Friday)

Location: Room 101, 2251 College (Archaeological Research Facility), UC Berkeley (See Map)

Co-sponsored by Center for Japanese Studies (CJS),  Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Archaeological Research Facility, Dept. of Anthropology and Berkeley Food Institute, UC Berkeley

This workshop highlights similarities and differences between agroecological approaches in Japan and those in the Americas with a focus on their historic and geographic contexts, and presents future visions of sustainable farming practice and resilient human-environmental interaction. Agroecology can be defined as a trans-disciplinary approach rooted in both traditional and scientific knowledge that seeks to design and manage productive, biologically diverse, resilient, and primarily small-scale agricultural systems. Starting with the discussion of Miguel Altieri’s seminal work on agroecolocy in South America and California, presenters in this workshop examine the roots, characteristics and goals of past and present agroecological approaches on the both sides of the Pacific Ocean.

1:00-1:10 Welcoming Remarks

1:10-1:40 Miguel Altieri (UC Berkeley): Agroecological Restoration at Multiple Scales: From Farm to Landscape

1:40-2:10 Kazumasa Hidaka (Ehime University): An Agroecological Approach towards Sustainable Farming Practice in Japan: Lessons from Satoyama and Traditional Ecological Knowledge

2:10-2:40 Junko Habu (UC Berkeley): Traditional Knowledge, Small-scale Organic Farming and the Consumer Movement in Post-WWII Japan: Continuity and Change in Social and Agricultural Landscapes

2:40-3:00 Tea Break

3:00-3:30 Joji Muramoto (Department of Environmental Studies, UCSC): Agroecology in California Strawberries: A Vision for the Post-Methyl Bromide Era

3:30-4:00 Clara Nicholls (UC Berkeley): Designing Climate-Change-Resilient Farms

4:00-5:00 Discusion

ABSTRACT PAGE

Related Link: Kyoto 2016 Agroecology Declaration

Free and open to the public. Event Contact:  cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415

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